Rebecca Strong, former Editor of InPrint, looks back on the creative processes involved in writing - and publishing - her first novel.

I had been editing InPrint for just under a year when I first heard from Tom Chalmers. He had started his own publishing company, Legend Press, and wrote an article about it for the magazine. Eventually Tom asked me for a quote for the back of his first short story collection, The Remarkable Everyday, and so we became better acquainted.

I had written a couple of short stories whilst at university, which were residing languidly on my computer hard drive. When one day I mentioned their existence, Tom said he’d be happy to read them and give me feedback. Encouraged, I went home and retrieved them, my mind spinning with renewed interest. But when I did a word count, my heart sank - each story totalled only 4,000 words. Memories of spending carefree student hours carefully constructing each story came flooding back; if I had put so much time and effort into such short stories, would I ever be able to write an entire, 75,000 word novel? Was I being too ambitious in trying to translate an occasional hobby into something many people painstakingly pursue as a full-time career?

But I knew I had nothing to lose, and Tom’s offer was invaluable. I emailed him both short stories, and we met soon afterwards to discuss them. I was both relieved and excited when he said that he liked my writing style, and suggested that I turn one of them into a novel. And so, the story began…

Many people have asked me how long it took to write a novel, and it’s a difficult question to answer. I started writing in February 2006, a few months after getting married and moving to a new house. I was working full-time, still editing InPrint and occupying an SYP committee role, and I had recently joined a church choir (which meant attending practices every Friday evening and services twice on a Sunday). Additionally, I was often catching up with friends after work during the week and seeing family on weekends. Tom and I agreed on deadlines, and my first was to get him 25,000 words by the end of March. This was hugely beneficial, not only because I work well under pressure, but because it meant I would receive his feedback along the way. I wrote as much as I could on free evenings, and dedicated Sunday afternoons to writing. The rest of the time I was developing the plot in my head, thinking constantly about the narrative and who the characters were, so that when I did sit down to write the sentences would flow. I knew that, no matter what, I couldn’t let this opportunity slip away, and in between the frustrations and self-doubt, I re-discovered the pleasure of writing. Two more deadlines passed, and Tom’s feedback was positive and constructive. By December I had sent him an entire first draft, and after taking his comments on board, I sent him a final draft at the end of January this year. It wasn’t until March 2007 that he confirmed he’d like to publish it this July.

I’m sure many of you, like me, have heard authors lamenting about how difficult it is to get a publishing deal - you have to get a miraculous break or know someone who knows someone… But it might not be as impossible at it seems. I met Tom because I got involved with the SYP, because I mentioned my interest in writing, and because I seized the opportunity to create a novel for his consideration, despite no guarantee of publication. And I can honestly say that as wonderful as it is to have my work published, it was equally as satisfying to prove to myself that I could write a novel I think is worth reading.

Writing fiction can be a very solitary process. You find yourself guarding your real thoughts and emotions, and channelling them into the fictitious world you’re breathing life into. Everything you encounter in your daily life is a potential spark for your imagination; you turn the superficial into intensity, the mundane into magic. Your muse hides in everyone, and everything. And, for me at least, this all-consuming process is a secret one: a drawn-out metamorphosis that’s hard to share. Yet you are not alone: the characters you have created invade your mind and keep you company. I wrote my story from the perspective of different characters, which challenged me as a writer and broadened the world I invented.

Here or There - Rebecca Strong - In all good bookstores now!

Here or There - Rebecca Strong - In all good bookstores now!

Here or There is for anyone who has made a choice in life and wondered if it’s the right one. It is for anyone who has been affected, directly or indirectly, by someone else’s decisions. It’s for anyone who has grabbed at life, and subsequently realised they’ve left the most important part behind. But most of all, it is for anyone who is still searching for that place in life they know they’ll never want to leave. I sincerely hope you will read and enjoy it.

© Rebecca Strong 2007

First published in the Society of Young Publishers’ magazine, InPrint, Summer 2007

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